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from here, this was the last time they saw america, and they made the ultimate sacrifice for us. as we transfer this treasure, this island, from the navy back to the city, i hope that all of us will remember the service and sacrifice of every sailor, every marine, living and dead. [applause] and the people who left from here and the people who serve today, risking everything, so that we can celebrate today. that legacy lives on in the young men and women who wear the cloth of this country and who are deployed around the world as we meet here today. when the famous or infamous bates 3 aligning closure process started in 1988, a final result of any individual base closure and transfer could not have hoped for a better ultimate outcome than what has been achieved in treasure island. the navy's charge is to dispose of property in a manner that promotes economic development. that has been done. the transfer of treasure island is a win for san francisco. it is a win for the state of california, a win for the united states navy, and a win for the american taxpayers who paid for this base and
it hard for people to stop using drugs and alcohol-it disrupts their lives, it disrupts their families, it disrupts their living situations, their friends. so i think some of the principles have to do with all of those things. there's many paths to recovery. so just as every human being is individual, their path to getting there is individual. there are principles about getting your life back, and that's why what alexandre said is so important-is that recovery has to do with all of those aspects of life. james, you've been there, along the path to recovery. you want to share with us some of your experiences? well, my experience has been that in-in-in the addiction itself, we're addicted to a drug, to a substance, and that the-the problem with that is that there's a problem within us that causes us to want to use a substance to hide from that-from-from, hide from the problem. and that my path was that there was a problem in me that i'd never took a look at. and so i chose to use crack, whatever it was, or other substances to-to medicate that, until i came to the point to realize that i
feet and 600,000 square feet. that sounds big but that only puts us in competition with a city like san diego. you have hotels in las vegas that have 1 million square feet of exhibition space. even with both of these projects. -- even with both of these projects, we are still small. these things could not only help to continue the revitalization of neighborhoods -- and those of you who remember this neighborhood 30 years ago -- things have changed quite a bit. we believe this would bring increased vitality to the neighborhood, increased spending in the city that would help overall -- the overall economy. when we look at the political will, we look at financing options and opportunities to take next that's. the best opportunity is mosconi east in 2008. that would be a perfect time live from what we believe meets the demand that is growing at the moment. the last thing i want to talk about his proposition j, the proposition to increase the hotel tax. it increases it two points, 14%. it just went up 13% two years ago, so we would have a 25% increase in hotel taxes in just a few years. it i
to millions of villages across china. that is the mentality of the company, all about growth and convincing us that we need more products. these are also in the most toxic categories and increasingly marketed to younger and younger girls. this is an example of a 5 or 7 year old on the cover of a skin, hair relaxer. these are ratings, that is the most toxic hair relaxers and no. 1 is a kid's product. then for hair dye, younger and younger girls are getting hair dye. "new york times", girls 10 and 11 are getting their hair dyed into the salon. it used to be 15 or 16. the industry was excited. this represent as growth market for the industries. it also represents age and continued chemical exposures to many of these toxins for young girls and more exposures to the environment as hair dyes get into the waterway and food even if we don't get our hair dyed. our skin should be lighter and darkers, smoother, lips plumper, these companies have so much power over our minds, public space and sense of self as they continue to expose us to chemicals even though safer alternatives are available. we have the
and way too many others to name. they beat to the drum beats of liberty. the difference between us and the shadows of fear is we have a lot more space to breathe. yet the smell of equality is found outside and sexuality is the right to physical expression between consenting adults. we can live outside of the closets but not out of the house. they are not welcome in the open fields of america. where others dream of marriage or defend our country. because not all of god's children were worthy to see the light beyond these cold, white walls. as long as we remain indoors. sometimes visit our souls. taking the time to join us, unable to come out and play. in only we could run and discover land starving for diversity. the emptiness and our perversions and sins as preached from religion pens, it touch the openings of children child faint sounds emerge from under closet doors. there are too many of us in this house located on a land far a war from normal chanting. we only want to be outside. we only want to be outside. the lord is outside. it's not wonder some would rather die moths in the
-701-4485 for copies. >> good morning, everyone. thank you so much for joining us at el cafe. we want to thank lourdes for housing us this morning. this was a really wonderful opportunity for us to get the community more involved. as many of you know we've been working really hard on our truancy and wanting to get our kids in our schools, staying in our schools, and make sure they're doing exactly what they're supposed to be doing. this effort has been a true effort between the city, the school district, and so many of our partners in the community, and this launch today is really about involving our community, our larger community, in what it is that we're trying to do. and so we want to just thank all of our community partners who are here, urban services, maria sue from the department of children, youth, and families. the s.f. police department, who has been really instrumental in making sure that our truancy process goes well, and captain lazar is here from the police department. want to thank him for all of his efforts and supporting what we're doing. and i have from the school district superinte
my son the same age as his daughter. why out of the 2 of us only one has bottom an adult. >> i'm never getting married. she sank back against the ground. i sat then next to her i could smell fabric softener. >> this is nothing hoeky about loving something with all your heart. that's not how anyone has loved me. that's why they leave me. i'm everyone's good luck charm but mine. >> she was right. there was nothing hoeky about a great love to span a lifetime. >> love struck couples staring into each other's eyes. waitress with tired legs waiting for the end of her shift receives a visit from johnitto. he turns, one last time to the faces above the steaming plates before he's out. into the neon lit street leaving behind a trail of rose petals, dark as sacrificial hearts. >> if we killed you now, if we took aim for your belly with our cross bow or laser sight and pulled a trigger or let a tipped arrow rip through the night air, there would not be a story to tell. so, while we lay and wait for you to appear, chewing the fat, lit up on beer. lit up on the last of the evening light
to me. she has given -- given me support without even using hard words. when i'm struggling she holds my hand, letting me know that i can count on her. whenever i feel sad or share a broken tear, she asked me for a hug and it is there in her arms that i feel protected like nothing that dares to touch me could hurt me. there is a power that grows inside me. when i find myself under her wings. under her wings i am calm. and she calls me mija, as if she were saying don't give unon account of stupid things. don't you see how strong you are? and my pain turns into a sincere smile and my soul doesn't feel hurt any hor. -- more. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> yay. and next up we have annie. annie yu, i'm sorry. annie yu. >> it's ok. so the poem i'm going to read is book of lives. my name is a book of lives. i press leaves inside, scraps of the city, one crumbled bus ticket, a number -- numb washed with rain, a torn photograph of two little girls. my name settle map of the world. a body of continents and stars. on an airplane i look at the map. flights intersect. travel miles and seas, hour
have said to me, how do we make it better with a sibling? what changed for us was the first thing that happened is, this is now my rule 1, take action. i flew out to the orchards, i panicked after 9/11. i would never get this better. what was i going to do? like everyone in new york and america, we were so traumatized with 9/11. i said to my husband, i am going to go out to the orchards. >> this is before you knew he was sick? >> i knew. he was still going full speed and no one would have known he was sick. he wasn't really sick, he just had his medical condition. i said i am going to go surprise him. i spent 2 days. >> simply because the world is coming to an end? >> i felt compelled. it was the moment i knew i had to turn the page. you just know. there is something that happens to you, i am going to turn the page. i was panicked. i was surprising him, he would have said no, i am too busy, i don't want you here. i spent a day running all over new york city trying not to freak out about the sirens buying flannel clothes, the right things for the orchard. this is ridiculous, i wear
breaking them. ha, ha, do you use a fish cake? yes, really? really? i have been looking for it. [laughter]. but i cannot find any. i got one. oh , no wonder i could not find it it is so thin. i can see through to over there. [laughter]. that's okay. sometimes at the noodle shops you use sponge cake it's terrible. hum, hum, yes. this is real sponge cake. that's okay. that's okay. i am a [inaudible] person anyway. do i have to eat it all? slurp... hum, yuk. slurp, hum... disgusting. i'm almost done. [laughter]. slurp, slurp. i gave up eating noodles. thank you, thank you. >> sometimes notable authors come to main stage and do more than read passages from their work. they sit in a live conversation with a reporter, playwright discusses the relevancy of his work with one of his theatre critics. as part of the yearly 1 city one book event. fields questions from sm scott chauffeur. >> before writing the book you want to louisiana and did a lot of research. what reception did you get there? what obstacles did you find? well -- it depends on which decade you are talking about. i did research, a
pedestrians can walk along the beautiful alleyways -- shared muses which deemphasized the comfortable use of automobiles. this shows you one of those shared street ways. this shows you a neighborhood park, which occurs on every block. these are part systems that bring people out of the community to enjoy their neighborhood. finally, what we think will be one of the really dramatic pieces of the island design, which is the city side our park. the east side neighborhood is built around a commons that is a long, linear park less stretches from the urban core out to the east side with those of you from berkeley will be able to gaze fondly at the new bay bridge. the third neighborhood is yerba buena island, where we will be building new, single-family homes that will nestle with in the concourse and the tree-lined of that existing natural vegetative island to have a very light impact, but to create a terrific new neighborhood. these neighborhoods, which will hold a total of 8000 homes, will be surrounded by 300 acres of public park. what is important is that we create a system in which they pr
to be here. i want to start right in about this book, um by having you read us, this letter that your brother wrote to you when he was at the university of pennsylvania and you were the younger sister that starts right down there. remind us roughly what the year was. >> the year was 1965. the moral of this story is never have a younger sister who never throws away a piece of paper. i discovered this letter 4 or 5 months before i finished this book oh my god, a paper trail sets us straight. >> read it to us. >> only people from brooklyn uses the word geez. your letter doesn't have a single worthwhile sentence in it. i will not buy you any notebooks. i repeat no notebooks. but i will send you decals that are not to be placed in my room, around my room or on the window of my car. >> okay. who was this guy? and why did you set out to tell this story? >> this guy was my fantastic, magnet, bossy, difficult, older brother carl. he was the red state to my blue state. all you have to understand to know about how complicated and difficult this relationship was my first memory of my brother was with whe
of the state. and when you compare us to any dense urban county, san francisco has the lowest unemployment rate. we have more public development than any other city in california. billions are being invested in a regional water system. this work is underway, with 40,000 jobs attached to this. this is not five years from now. these construction projects are happening right now. it was said that there is work that is being done -- that the second most unsafe thoroughfare in the united states of america. think about that. this was constructed with the same design of the bridge. and this is the structural rating through this. this project was dead on arrival. we spoke optimistically about the sock. and now, this is under construction -- about this. and now, this is under construction. we have the federal dollars and the state dollars. we have those who believe everything that they read, and they thought that the stimulus program actually delivered the final funding for this. and the direct appropriations because of the leadership of nancy pelosi. and the stimulus money would take us right over the
morning, everyone. they keep for having us here today. that was a great video. i think it rivals our videos now. after 40 years of planning, debating, talking about it, we are finally constructing the transbay transit center. it is remarkable for many of us who have been working on this for so long. as the mayor indicated, we had a wonderful groundbreaking on august 11. we had the u.s. secretary of transportation ray lahood, speaker of the house nancy pelosi, senator boxer, mayor newsom, who has been supporting this project since he was a supervisor, and the california high speed rail authority, all on hand to celebrate the groundbreaking of the first high-speed rail station in the united states. the first modern bus station built in this country in the past 40 years. on august 6 in the evening, we shut down the existing transbay terminal. the next day on august 7, we started operations at the temporary facility at main and beale. we are currently in demolition. so far, we have demolished the east ramp on howard we are working now on the west ramp. then we will have the demolition of
was 10 times stronger than the concrete that is used to support the building. >> okay, moving to another part of the city, this is the eastern side. >> this is on army street? >> yes, this is army st., se. look at all that stuff. it is an active city. >> a lot of the old industrial, the american can co., goodman lumber. all that good stuff. >> wow. >> and this building is one of the examples of remaining 1906 earthquake damage. it has been repaired above, and that is where they repaired the damage. what did they found these buildings on, back in the early days? >> those days, remember i mentioned early on, it would use of redwood grillage and they would extend the grillage up far enough so it would spread out the load. today, one would know when to evaluate a building like this, we say to ourselves, there is no way this building can be standing. the bearing pressures that are being posed on the soil far exceed the strength of the materials present, yet it works. it could be such a phenomenon as arching and other things to keep the building standing. typically, today, we would support thi
park. it shows roosevelt in his convertible. if you visit there, you could see he could drive using the upper part of his body. he's pointing to the plans of the hyde park. he was quite a passable architect. once he became president, he was able to build a lot more. even though henry loose was generally opposed to roosevelt. we ran a double page on his to show how the work he had done. i couldn't get it all on my standards. in the west, you would see without the new deal projects, the republican voting sun belt cities wouldn't exist. they were built at that time. so, it's as i say. there was at least a dozen agencies that left remnants. i am going to give you a primer on all of these. the premise was to put people to work. there were agencies that covered all of these. the land had been ruinned by a variety of things. this is one of the posters and these are archival photographs. this shows the ccc boys. many of them had been riding the rails. they were starving. they were illiterate. here they are in one of the camps, which were run by the army and it was like a military organizati
us on the third thursday. today, we have a special program about san francisco's neighborhoods geology. we have frank, the geotechnical engineer who will walk us through a lot of this. we also have an architect who knows a lot about the history of the city. he keeps his eyes open and has a lot of information to share. we also have the chief building inspector. we are going to go through this by having frank give us a brief overview of the geology of sentences go. then we're going to look at a series of slides around the city. and see how the geology of the city affects the environment. their special problems and issues that arise we will try to answer questions as we go, particularly related to how the environment release to the underlying geology of the city. those are questions that rarely get asked. this is a chance for you to join us and ask your questions as well. welcome, frank. i see that you brought a big aerial photograph with overly geology. >> it is a big google map with overly geology. the different colors depict the different formations or deposits beneath san fran
of shipping containers. it was important for us that we made this project for the place, of the place. what i mean by that is participants would also used repurchased materials. >> we will be speaking to one of the artists that you selected. what excited you about his idea? >> have many things. first of all, i am a fan of his architecture. because of that creativity, i knew that he could come up with something unique. i love the fact that he was specifically addressing the landscape around here, and it was also about the human interaction with this place. >> what are your expectations with the people coming to presidio habitat? >> we really hope people will come with their family, dogs, and come back a number of times the works will change over the year. the feedback we are getting is you cannot do all of them on one visit. it is really better to come back and have different experiences. >> thank you. i am with mark jensen of jensen architect. he was one of the architects to be chosen to do the presidio habitat. when you heard about this project, what inspired you about that call? >> our insp
use this as an example to help bridge the gap that we live in. we live in a food desert. we have very little access to good quality, healthy food. one of the things that i'm interested in bringing is with the development in universal paragon, the southern-most part of the city, there's an opportunity for us to first sustain the businesses that have been providing some food supplies as well asfh4jl- parth developers that understand our challenges and that are willing to bring healthy food options to the southeast part of san francisco. so to answer the question on bay vurek i'd like to see a farmer's market specifically designated on the hill. thank you. >> thank you very much. that minute is tough, we know. >> thank you. i'm christine inea. my ideas for bringing fresh produce into district 10 are as follows. one, support the opening of the fresh and easy market in third street on bay view. two, continue to support the redevelopment, which i believe will include a full service grocery store in visitation valley. third, i would like to support the redevelopment agency's efforts of the
last." where is the grocery store? the fact of the matter is for us to get adequa grocers, we either go to walgreens or go to the 16th street safeway or tehe+iá>u? foodsco where you ct buy meat. it is a challenge to raise a family. you have to put in services first, public transit second, and then we can worry about cars. >> one reason why have the no. 2 endorsement from the sierra club was the we spend too much of our land and resources on cars. we have eight times the asthma rate. a shorter life expectancy year. we have to get serious about addressing that. it is literally killing us. we need to make public transportation and other alternatives more attractive. we need to redesign our routes. we need dedicated lanes for bicycles and transit. we need better to language and access services. we need better shuttle buses and more reliable transfers. eventually, muni needs to be free to ride. we need to think big. >> i definitely think we need to put public transit -- more effort into fixing the public transit system. we need to expand on what our vision of public transit is the cannot o
used to be a woman who appeared under that street light over there and our heads would all go as one with the street light. it was though we were looking for the lady who walked in front of our house and didn't have a head. when she got to this street light she vanished. then in the same breath she would say, now would you go into the house and get me a drink of water? i would have to go into that creeky old house all by myself. it wasn't so bad in the living room because the lights from the front porch, but she had a table that had claw feet and i knew it was going to snatch me by the ankles and never be heard from again. i scaled along the wall carefully. when i got to the kitchen, it was pitch dark, couldn't see your hand before you. why didn't you just switch on the light? we didn't have a wall switch in that old country house. there was a light in the center of the room with a cord that hung down and had to go all the way into that dark, dark kitchen, like going into a mouth. you go in and feeling around for the pull switch. meanwhile my brother would slip around the side of the
a historic survey in the bay view project area. we can use the knowledge to create an historic district. we can create a lot of character in the bayview town center. we can do other things in the commercial quarters. there are two approaches to affordability. raising income is one we need to focus more attention on. >> mr. jackson? >> when we talk about housing, jobs, and careers, we do not go the step deeper we need to. what types of housing question if there is no clamoring for an abundance of market rate housing. this committee has a deficit in the affordable housing. -- this community has a deficit in affordable housing. we did not sign up to have the regional housing crisis of on our backs. we need a strategy to solve the foreclosure issues happening in our communities. we support is sustainable for affordable housing and affordable housing construction. we also need to ensure we have a cooperative land trust approach to ensure the when people are for closed on a home, the city can buy foreclosed property to help keep those people in their homes. when we talk about job development, wha
think some of the best where you used to be in new mexico. they're doing a lot of that. that's correct. and these-these models really recognize the science, that the components of a person's life don't exist in-in a vacuum, nor do the components of a system exist in a vacuum. and recovery really, and frankly prevention as well, really has to do with multiple dimensions at the same time, sustained over time. and so that's the kind of system of care approach. very good. james, i want to go back to, for you to be able to tell us, you have done such a great job of getting individuals, of providing for individuals that second chance. can you tell us about the business that you started and how it's helping individuals that are in recovery? well, the business i started is a company i started, it's called the choice is yours, inc. and that was developed from a conversation with my sponsor on the phone trying to find a name for a company, and he, his frustration with me grew, so he said, "i'm going to bed, james. the choice is yours." and so it came about because of his frustration with me. now
to make sure they are closed. we have to continue to push for a land use issues. 258 bed hospital is being built. we need to make sure they provide enough charity care to provide access to health care in this neighborhood and in this entire district. the program that i was working on -- we need to make sure it is not cut and ensure that our residents who are uninsured have access to health care. that's how you cut down the rates of health care, making sure that land use decisions do not adversely impact our decisions. >> mr. kelly. >> first, you have to make sure you keep district 10 together. we are together on exactly this issue. the biggest cause of the asthma rate here is the freeways. i've been advocating that we should take a serious look at seeing if we can anend 280. the city has proven that the one thing it can do well is to take down a freeway. we can maybe do the job here and would still have a boulevard that would serve mission bay. we need to get serious and invest resources in addressing the causes of pollution. we need more youth and family services. we need to look for furt
are not. we have a long way to go. >> the city of san francisco is using the most innovative technology available. these devices allow people to remain out in their communities, doing things like shopping. it is great to be able to walk as a pedestrian in this city and cross streets safely.>> did. i am delighted to welcome you to the richmond library. it is a wonderful space. thank you. [applause] i'm very honored and feel very privileged to have the library be at the center of the selection for san francisco's poet laureate. this is my second experience under mayor nredom, -- newsom. i want to thank you for a couple of reasons. first and foremost to bring the announcement to the richmond. it is an opportunity to preview this beautiful library opening tomorrow, a grand reopening of the richmond library. the first in the city, from 1914 cricket -- from 1914. this is no. 10. we are on a roll. secondarily, it is a port -- important because the poet laureate has a tradition people, and this library -- what better place to celebrate the announcement are new:gloria? with me, gavin newsom, who
recycling at home and use these bins you see behind me. i do not want this to become a psa for our recycling efforts, although that is always good, and remember, it is the kids teaching the adults, which is always good. but this is good for the environment, good for the economy, and a san francisco can do this, cities across california and cities across america can do this. i will remind you of the great line by michelangelo, who said that the biggest risk is not that we aim to hawaii and miss but that we aim to low and --. it would have been easy for us to have a goal of 50% recycling rate by 2020. a lot of states, a lot of cities across the state, that will be tow%8x4ç:vw1qs8mna ++%uq when you do that, you get people to organize that quality of imagination, where people in the private sector and public sector, using the entrepreneurial and innovative spirit coming up with new ideas and attitudes that may seem untoward or a little controversial or extreme at first, but suddenly, when you peel it back and look back two or three years, you go, "my gosh, that makes so much since." if you make
the content with us on "culture wire." >> thank you very much. >> it is in celebration of the 40th anniversary of the strikes at uc-berkeley of the study of ethnic studies. it is a celebration of that history, as well as some of the other items. >> what led to this multidisciplinary collaboration? >> i am from san francisco, and from the 1960's on, that is the aesthetics. the poets, working with the musicians, dancers, the waitresses, the jazz club, actors, whatever. the idea is we are all a community and we share this common story. >> did you reach out to the dancers? how did it come together? did they come to you? >> the choreographer and dancer actually was a student of mine and residency in cameron house and chinatown. i developed a friendship with her over many years, and also with the spoken word artists. i met him at a benefit at one of the benefits in chinatown. it is part of that ongoing really rich relationship building that happens in our arts community. >> i got a chance to hear a little bit of your performance, and i am a big fan of john coltrane, and you play a phenomenal sax. ca
. it's to remind us, while i was looking at these projects, they employed 42 percent women. it's very unusual in the art world. and then of course, in san francisco, benny lafono. we had the first and the last of the new deal. coit tower is the first. it is i think, one of the best in the country. it shows san francisco's history and that of human civilization shown through the eyes of labor. these are things that happened in san francisco's history. lynchings. again, coit tower, shows you the stock market dropping. something people weren't used to seeing. and a business many being held up. and in george washington high school, the farther of our country pointing the pioneers west as they walk over a dead indian. most of the art is not controversial. most of the artists celebrates local produce. this is one of the most extraordinary murals i have seen. at a tuberculosis cemetery. they also painted a mural in san francisco. finally, it's on the outside of the berkeley community theater. all people brought together through the arts. unfortunately, it was not the last. the war came along
the ecstasy of fruit sures. this is us at farmer's market. brother too complicate who had offers an arm for her and me. a chain of chins along his shoulders. where have you been and why has it taken you so long to come back? >> the piece dedicated to my foster father and cousin on my adopted side. 1, daddy. old crow, jack dan jells understood my father mouthfuls at a time. jim beam and old forester where uncles rolled up in the sufficiented hennesy take it's first breath and hound dog laughter and dominos falling like hail on the dining table. relatives existed through stories and memory ease in like zombies on ropes of camel smoke and demand a texas holdum. no wonder they call it spirits. spirits vad my father with cower vas yea. spirits made him burn rubber screaming in the driveway. the marianet and tongue were skillets at mid night. i wouldn't see his ass again until the next afternoon. twoshgs johnnie. gee my cousin john edwards volunteered for possession every week. he was certified. ex exor citizenim did nothing. colt 45, crazy horse they demand the sacrifices in blood so bottle
to be careful how we use it and our children. it answers the question, why do you write that? i write to tell the story. one that has fallen through the cracks, one marginalized by main stream history. either misrepresented or represented to the way in which it is a stereo typical, write to take those stereotypes, reshape them and give them back to you dressed in a new dress. i mean when i say different is not a synonym for wrong, it means that we should celebrate those things. everyone in this room is different in some way. but you should not feel bad about that. your uniqueness, as my grandson who loves to make up words, that is your wonderment. [laughter]. it answers that question that we get asked most often is why do you write? you can say pat is write to tell that different story and different is not a synonym for wrong. before i was a writer, however, i was a listener. i grew up listening to stories. listening to language. come with me to nashville, tennessee to an old farmhouse set back off the road, a little house, window here, window here and doorway that looked like a face. the win
some good legislation has been put in place where there is a formula retail conditional use in that particular area, so that chain stores will have a high bar in order to get in, in that area. we try to make it mom and pop driven sensitive. we want to see -- i'd like to see certainly more, you know, just kind of independent businesses going in in that area. >> it is a residential street. it is in the midst of a residential neighborhood. and i think there is a general and overwhelming consensus that the commercial activities on haight street should be small, contained, and as here as possible as is economically possible, which is not very economically possible as neighborhood serving as possible. unfortunately, the market forces in this part of the world are immensely strong. and what we're seeing is more and more speciality retail on haight street. >> hayes valley is certainly impacted by its proximity to both our seat of government and our performing arts institutions. we're very fortunate to be located right on the boundary of both of those wonderful resources. and certain
started gathering up his clothes. hang with us for a while. busy day tomorrow. >> my other job, bacheloret party. i strip for private parties. that's what this is for. he was stepping into his fatigues. apparently impressed. it ain't worth the bus fair half the time. patrice shrubbed. if a sister has a plate of ribs, there's no way to held her attention. ben and i laughed. i'm serious. tickled to his response. i am up there working my ass off and they are sitting down there with their press on nails. tough crowd. they say they like the mens, he drew out the last. but they don't like the mens like the mens. they don't tip as good either. he came to the bed until we came his naked book ends. he laid there for a while. be well my brothers. he said at the door. [applause] good even and welcome. jack hirschman. he has been a poet in san francisco from 2006. his powerful voice set the tone, his latest book, "all that's left". >> my voice is a little untuned. very simply so they are not any question of anxiety or worry. on march 14th, i decided to take an operation on my carotted arte
after the u.s. entry into that space. the title of the poem and it is the words the probably roost which is bitter. biting, cutting, sharp. bitan. once, she was a fearest dark girl who's tongue skipped top of meeting. teeth, teeth top of mouth like double dutch with the word that ment her thoughts cutting circles through the day. no chance she'd be the one to trip and break rhythm. then she could sit all day on her porch memorizing the trees. she could be still. the birds, winged through leaves like they didn't know anyone could hurt them. once she believed steam curled off asphalt when summer rains stopped with a prophecy. she believed this looked the way she would feel after touching a man. her body clean. and black. and right. something beautiful and painless rising up. i was talking with a friend about that idea of leaving places. and leaving places behind the title of this poem is stolen directly from this conversation in which he said there is a particular state that he would never go back to. >> that's a state i will never go back to. for doug. >> once i got over the problem of
. instead, i take a back door approach and use my finger. i have a lot of stretching to do. week 41, 3:45 p.m. it feels like i have to pee and poo. she says long contractions indicate early labor. she says call in a few hours. >> dana comes over. she feeds her tea while i'm having contractions. i am in active labor. i am surprised you're so calm. i say, i'm surprised you're so calm. 11:30 p.m. dana drives to the birth center. i tell her right now i am not sad to do this. this is a solo expedition. i dark brown blob of slim e falls out. the mucous plug has to fall out. it's the mucous plug. i am in awe of dana. 1:30 a.m. i am naked. i modified downward dog. i think of the view everyone is getting. no one cares. 4:00 a.m., i am nine centimeters. i am pruned and exhausted. you are doing great dana says, i am not interested in being great. it's still nine centimeters. it's not time yet. she says me to blow out with my mouth. i say i might barf. 5:45 a.m. still nine, i hate dana. dana breaks my water. after 15 hours it's time to push. when you are this desperate, it's almost over. push, your pus
viable, the better off we are. in san francisco there's more dogs than children. finding a viable use for dog poop. >> proenvironmental policies, that's a way to win hearts and that's a way to win hearts and minds. (music) hello, i'm ivette torres, and welcome to another edition of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about maintaining resiliency and sustaining recovery. joining us in our panel today are pamela s. hyde, administrator, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services,
, and also the merging history's coming together. what would we look like if we carry our history with us? all of the merging of cultures, reflected in our address? i am thinking of my own history with early europeans coming in and intermixing with native cultures. the one thing i would like people to take away from after seeing my work is a sense of wonder and who we are as americans. that we are really these beautiful mixes of people and we should really be looking backwards at who we are. i think we are all kind of historians in our own life, and there are great presidents behind us -- president behind us that could give us insight into who we are. >> oliver road trip on her website. check at often. new experiences will be added after every stop.
with us tonight. [inaudible] dancing. step dancing which we are familiar with. you may have seen this before. this will be a treat. [applause]. >> someone once told me this was from scandanavia. this is a different version. about 2 sisters that fall in love with the same guy. it didn't work out too well. one of the sisters throws another one into the raging water. he fashions her body into a fiddle, into a violin. this is the actual violin. i love her so much. [singing] [music playing] [applause] [music playing] [applause] knew >> we are going to finish off a with [inaudible]. yeah. [applause]. [music playing]. >> [applause]. >> [applause].
as cultural ambassadors from the u.s.. we are teaching them in committees so that the next generation here in america and back to india or bali or whatever will be able to get enriched by these very beautiful art forms. >> thank you for watching "culture wire." and you can find more information >> welcome to "cultu" today we are visiting southern exposure in san francisco alison prepares to launch a fantastic new project called beautiful possibilities. we will send them on a two-year adventure crisscrossing the united states to investigate american history and contemporary culture. it is using a traveling road show as inspiration. she will sit down and talk with residents in search of stories and experiences that reveals exactly what makes us americans. >> beautiful possibility is a traveling research project that i will take on a five-month journey across the united states and lower canada. i document this tore on a map that i painted for the project and also from previous projects called the road map to lost america. on the map i have taken all of the contemporary borders off the map and
into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. >> san francisco's buses and trains serve many riders who are blind or how low vision. muni is their lives line to get around. simple act of courtesy can help them access muni services safely. it is not just courtesy. it is the law. >> i used to take the 21 airlock. >> lot of times, when i would be waiting at the bus stop, the door would open and the driver would announce the bus line. >> 71. >> it is easier and preferable when a driver sees someone
tom for running a very tight ship and getting us out of your on-time -- out of here on time. i appreciate the lead for a really great organization. for those of you interested in district 6, we are having a debate here on october 7, 6:00 here. thank you very much. [applause] >> we are just going to say good night here. one more paragraph. on behalf of the league of women voters and our partner organizations, the potrero hill organization of businesses, the dog patch organization, the university of california san francisco, media sponsors nbc bay area -- we are proud to be here -- san francisco government television and educational access tv, and certainly, our thanks to the candidates for participating and thanks to you for being here tonight, informing yourself, being good citizens of san francisco. good night, everyone. [applause]
panels that power the center. >> here we are using real energy, energy from the sun, free energy from the sun coming in right here. this converts directly into electricity. >> all these technologies cost money. they don't make economic sense. solar never made economic sense. bio fuels never made economic sense. it's when it was adopted that it started making sense. >> some of them have challenges, that take a long time to prove out, but there's no reason that the challenge of where we will get tomorrow's energy in the united states should not produce a very, very large. >> san francisco is unique in the united states because we serve our own power needs. >> the city of san francisco is well positioned in that we are perfectly located to take advantage of any renewable category. >> we tend to be the last one to figure it all out. it's real people that are saying, enough's enough. . >> the answer is going to be in renewable. the sooner we do something about it, the easier it will be it resolve. >> we're not just talking about what a city can do, we're doing it. >> san francisco has set
stain of one circle that diminishes the paintings that clouds let pass over us. clouds that pass over the beach of my childhood. near streets when i was a child. escaping the light of the moon of san pedro. the secret garden of my first poem. by the beach. my boyhood slow kiss on the lips of that girl. the kiss of my grand mother, witnesses clouds and dogs flying over the blue embrace of my water. that remains to live in my grandfather and purple on the hill of the last poem. >> foreign language speaking. [applause]. >> day 303. spirit of the black box. today i was in the mind of child. 517, 1823 unintelligible words. of high frequency waves, the first hug, the first cry, tell me that all that there is to forget to be really entertained only by the light, the divine light. [applause]. >> foreign language speaking. >> day 344. the birth of silence is written in the agony of a sigh. >> foreign language speaking. >> day 345, silence is the slave of fear. even though we treat fear like a king. [applause]. >> this is a piece about walking. [music] [applause]. [music] [applause]. >> thank y
, the light cycle built into it. >> it brings san francisco from one of the major cities in the u.s. to what is going to be the lead city in the country. >> city working on all sorts of things. we are trying to be new and innovative and go beyond the ada says and make life more successful for people. >> disability rights movement, the city has the overall legal obligation to manage and maintain the accessibility and right of way. with regards to the curb ramps, bounded by a groove border, 12-inch wide border. for people with low vision to get the same information. the shape of the domes, flush transition between the bolt bottom of the ramp and gutter. >> we have a beveled transition on the change in level, tape on the surfaces, temporary asphalt to fill in level changes, flush transition to temporary wood platform and ramp down into the street under the scaffoldinging. detectable ramps. they are all detectable. nothing down below or protruding that people are going to get snagged up on. smooth clean that nobody is going get caught up on. >> our no. 1 issue is what we see here, the uplifting
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